How many species of Lyme / Borrelia are there?

How many species of Lyme / Borrelia are there?

So we know that Borrelia Burgdorferi is a genus of bacteria.

 What do we not know?

It is said there are 100 known species of Borrelia.

 In my research so far, there are 36 known species of Borrelia that have been found since French Biologist Aimee Borrel, (1867–1936), brought this bacterium strain to the forefront.  This bacterium was found in ticks and lice.

Here are the species and the dates found.

•             Borrelia afzelii Canica et al. 1994

•             Borrelia americana Rudenko et al. 2010

•             Borrelia andersonii ♠ Marconi et al. 1995

•             Borrelia anserina ♦ (Sakharoff 1891) Bergey et al. 1925

•             Borrelia baltazardii ♦ (ex Karimi et al. 1979) Karimi et al. 1983

•             Borrelia bavariensis ♠ Margos et al. 2009

•             Borrelia bissettii ♠ Postic et al. 1998

•             Borrelia brasiliensis ♦ Davis 1952

•             Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson et al. 1984 emend. Baranton et al. 1992 (Lyme disease spirochete)

•             Borrelia californiensis ♠ Postic et al. 2007

•             Borrelia carolinensis Rudenko et al. 2011

•             Borrelia caucasica ♦ (Kandelaki 1945) Davis 1957

•             Borrelia coriaceae Johnson et al. 1987

•             Borrelia crocidurae ♦ (Leger 1917) Davis 1957

•             Borrelia dugesii ♦ (Mazzotti 1949) Davis 1957

•             Borrelia duttonii ♦ (Novy and Knapp 1906) Bergey et al. 1925

•             Borrelia garinii Baranton et al. 1992

•             Borrelia graingeri ♦ (Heisch 1953) Davis 1957

•             Borrelia harveyi ♦ (Garnham 1947) Davis 1948

•             Borrelia hermsii ♦ (Davis 1942) Steinhaus 1946

•             Borrelia hispanica ♦ (de Buen 1926) Steinhaus 1946

•             Borrelia japonica Kawabata et al. 1994

•             Borrelia kurtenbachii Margos et al. 2010

•             Borrelia latyschewii ♦ (Sofiev 1941) Davis 1948

•             Borrelia lonestari ♠ Barbour et al. 1996

•             Borrelia lusitaniae Le Fleche et al. 1997

•             Borrelia mazzottii ♦ Davis 1956

•             Borrelia merionesi ♠ Hougen 1974

•             Borrelia microti ♠

•             Borrelia miyamotoi Fukunaga et al. 1995

•             Borrelia parkeri ♦ (Davis 1942) Steinhaus 1946

•             Borrelia persica ♦ (Dschunkowsky 1913) Steinhaus 1946

•             Borrelia queenslandica PopeJG et. al. 1962

•             Borrelia recurrentis ♦ (Lebert 1874) Bergey et al. 1925

•             Borrelia sinica Masuzawa et al. 2001

•             Borrelia spielmanii Richter et al. 2006

•             Borrelia tanukii Fukunaga et al. 1997

•             Borrelia theileri ♦ (Laveran 1903) Bergey et al. 1925

•             Borrelia tillae ♦ Zumpt and Organ 1961

•             Borrelia turcica Güner et al. 2004

•             Borrelia turdi Fukunaga et al. 1997

•             Borrelia turicatae ♦ (Brumpt 1933) Steinhaus 1946

•             Borrelia valaisiana Wang et al. 1997

•             Borrelia venezuelensis ♦ (Brumpt 1921) Brumpt 1922

•             Borrelia vincentii ♥

•             Candidatus Borrelia texasensis Lin et al. 2005

There is now new species found. One is called Borrelia Burgdorferi sensu lato which was discovered in Japan and in February of 2016 Borrelia Mayorelii was found in Wisconsin and Michigan.

The Borrelia Sansu Lato is only found in Japan. I have not found in the study what the symptoms are from this species of bacteria.

 

Borrelia Mayorii has a rash that can appear more spread out and apparently adds nausea and vomiting to the list of typical Lyme symptoms, which include fever, headache and neck pain. B. mayonii patients also had a higher-than-expected concentration of bacteria in their blood.  This information is from Dr. Pratt of the Mayo clinic.

 

The list can be found on Wikipedia and the other two are from ScienceDirect.com and TheNewYorkTimes.com.

With this information, please try to remember that ticks are not the only vector carrying the Borrelia bacteria. It can be contracted from any blood sucking insect. (and in the South West a type of lizard).

The more you know the more you can prevent getting Lyme disease.